Vedic Maths: Completing the Whole

Let’s start from the basics. In arithmetic there are nine numbers and a 0. All the numbers are made using these. We need to understand the Place value of these numbers.

PLACE VALUE
We count numbers in groups of 10. Each place has a value of 10 times the place to its right.
Ten Units make a 10
Ten Tens make a 100
Ten Hundreds make a 1000 and so on…
In any number its value depends on its position/place.
In the number 2583: Value of 2 is 2000; 5 is 500; 8 is 80 and 3 is 3.

10 s: Group of 10 units/ones.
100s: Group of 10 tens
1000s: Group of 10 hundreds
10000: Group of 10 thousands

Ten Point Circle

vedicmaths_tenpointcircle

If you look at the circle closely you will notice that the opposite numbers add to 10 (5 will add to itself and make 10)
Our number system is based on the number 10 and proceeds in cycles of 10 e.g. 10, 20, 30 and so on. The reason behind this is that compared to the other numbers; ‘10’ is a very easy number to handle.

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IMO for Class 3 : Syllabus

Syllabus for Grade 3 

Number sense

  • Comparing numbers
  • Abacus and place value
  • Word problems

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Class 3 IMO : Papers

Grade 3 IMO papers

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imo-ieo-nso-ncoimo-ieo-nco-nso

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Grade 3 Maths (IMO) : Division

Let’s talk about what division really is — it is repeated subtraction; much the way multiplication is repeated addition.

Let’s say I have the basic problem 16 ÷  4.  I could start with 16 and then subtract 4, subtract another 4, another 4, and another 4 until I run out and reach zero.  I would have to do this 4 times. If I had 16 cookies that I wanted to share equally among 4 friends, I could do the “one for you, one for you, one for you, and one for you” process and still end up with 4 cookies for each.

But what about 375 ÷ 50? If I don’t know how to divide by double digit numbers, the repeated subtraction process might actually be a good choice . . . at least showing some number sense to know that 375 divided by 50 means “How many 50’s in 375?” I know if I subtract 50 six times, I still have 75 left. I can subtract another 50 and I have 25 left over. So 375 ÷ 50 = 7 with a remainder of 25.

Dividing using the distributive law

Division Possible Split Calculation Answer
69 ÷ 3 60 + 9 (60 ÷ 3) = 20

(9 ÷ 3)  = 3

20 + 3 = 23
391 ÷ 3 390 + 1  (390 ÷ 3) = 130

(1 ÷ 3) = cannot be divided

130 with Remainder 1

 Long Division

Before a child is ready to learn long division, he/she has to know: Continue reading

Grade 3 Maths (IMO) : Number sense

Place value and Face value

Face value of a digit  is the digit itself whereas Place value can be termed as the location of the digit in the numeral.

 

The value of a place in the place value chart is 10 times the value of the place just to its right.

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Grade 3 Maths (IMO) : Addition strategies

Listing down some methods to simplyfy addition.

  • Doubles (such as 6 + 6)
  • Near doubles: Try adding a double and the remainder. Solve 7 + 6,  (6 + 6+ 1) or (7 + 7 – 1).
  • Making a ten or a multiple of 10: To add 7 + 6, I can take 3 from the 6 and put it with the 7 to make 10 and 3. This holds good even with multiples of 10 like 20, 30 40, etc
  • 1 more, 1 less: Show problems such as: 8 + 1, 51 + 1, and 6 – 1, 22-1
  • Place value Decomposition: 35 + 22 can be decomposed into tens and ones 30+20 added to 5+2. Or 35 – 22 can be decomposed to 30-20 plus 5-2.

Pictorial representation of the strategies above :

 

 

Papers olympiad : IMO Class 2

Sample IMO practice papers for Grade 2

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IMO-WORKSHEET-NO.-11

IMO-Worksheet-No.-21

IMO-Worksheet-No.-31

IMO-WORKSHEET-NO.-41

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IMO for grade 2

Have tried breaking the syllabus given by IMO into smaller parts for better understanding.

Syllabus :

Number sense

  • Numerals and number name (3 digits)
  • Comparing Numbers
  • Arranging numbers in ascending or descending order
  • Abacus and Places values
  • Expanded form
  • Even and odd numbers
  • Formation of a number from given digits/information

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